Mount TrueNAS Core Samba share on Linux

This is a guide that describes on how to mount a remote Samba share configured on TrueNAS on to a Linux machine.

 

Login in your Linux machine. (I am using a Linux Mint 19.3 in this demo. This should technically work on other Debian/Ubuntu based systems as well).

Use the following commands to get your current user’s user ID (UID) and group ID (GID) respectively.

id -u $USER
id -G $USER

Create a file /etc/.truenas_creds. This is where you would store the samba credentials.

Replace text in red with the username and password of the remote SMB share which was configured in TrueNas.

cat /etc/.truenas_creds
username=enter_username_here
password=enter_password_here

Modify the file permissions so that root is the owner and set the file permission to 600.

sudo chown root: /etc/.truenas_creds
sudo chmod 600 /etc/.truenas_creds

In your linux machine, create a folder to where you want the contents of the remote samba share to be mounts. For example: create a directory named /mnt/truenas/.

sudo mkdir /mnt/truenas/

-Below is a sample syntax that can be used for populating /etc/fstab.

//ip-of-nas-server/enter-remote-samba-share/location /enter-local-mount/location/here/ cifs credentials=/etc/.truenas_creds,iocharset=utf8,uid=enter_your_uid_here,gid=enter_your_gid_here,noperm 0 0

-Here is what that I added in /etc/fstab.

//192.168.1.12/mnt/truenas /mnt/truenas/ cifs credentials=/etc/.truenas_creds,iocharset=utf8,uid=1000,gid=1000,noperm 0 0

My TrueNAS server’s IP => 192.168.1.12

Remote samba share => /mnt/truenas

Local mount location => /mnt/truenas/

Credentials for samba share => /etc/.truenas_creds

-Once complete, run the following to mount all entries looking at /etc/fstab.

mount -a

-If there are no errors in the above command, check your local mount path to verify that the mount was successful.

ls -l /mnt/truenas/

References:

linuxize

Askubuntu

Bash script to loop through values in a file with space as a separator

Lets say we have a file with list of IPs that are space separated and you want to read each of the values to pass to a loop to perform an operation. Here is an example file with IP Addresses separated  by a space:

cat ips.txt
192.168.1.1 192.168.1.10

Now, lets say you want to loop through these IPs and run a ping command against each of them.

cat ping.sh
#!/bin/bash

# IFS is an internal bash variable. Here, we set its value as space.
IFS=$" "
# Read the file "ips.txt" and store the list of values to a variable "ips"
ips="$(cat ips.txt)"

# Run the following loop which will loop through each of the ips and run a ping test
for ip in $ips; do ping -c 1 $ip; done
# Unset the IFS variable so that it wont mess with the reset of the script
unset IFS

-Running this loop, will loop through the list of IP addresses and perform a ping.

./ping.sh
PING 192.168.1.1 (192.168.1.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 192.168.1.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.660 ms

--- 192.168.1.1 ping statistics ---
1 packets transmitted, 1 received, 0% packet loss, time 0ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.660/0.660/0.660/0.000 ms
PING 192.168.1.10 (192.168.1.10) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 192.168.1.10: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.108 ms

--- 192.168.1.10 ping statistics ---
1 packets transmitted, 1 received, 0% packet loss, time 0ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.108/0.108/0.108/0.000 ms

Hope this helps!

Happy scripting folks! 🙂

Source/References: Link

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